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War/No More Trouble

April 25, 2010


War/No More Trouble | Playing for Change | Song Around The World

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Don’t Worry

April 25, 2010


“Don’t Worry” is the first original song around the world featured by Playing For Change. It was written by Pierre Minetti in Barcelona, Spain and speaks of the unity we all share on this planet. As the song states. “Let’s don’t worry my brother, in this world we are all the same, we must find peace…” The video features over 20 musicians from 4 continents who have never met in person, but are connected through the message and the music.

One Love – Song Around the World

April 25, 2010


Bob Marley and us Playing For Change
From the award-winning documentary, “Playing For Change: Peace Through Music”, comes an incredible rendition of the legendary Bob Marley song “One Love” with Keb’ Mo’ and Manu Chao. This is the third video from the documentary and a follow up to the classic “Stand By Me” and the incredible “Don’t Worry.” Released in celebration of Bob Marley’s birthday on February 6th, this tribute to the legend is performed by musicians around the world adding their part to the song as it traveled the globe.
Playing For Change | Peace Through Music

The Revolution Will Not Be Televised

April 24, 2010

You will not be able to stay home, brother.
You will not be able to plug in, turn on and cop out.
You will not be able to lose yourself on skag and skip,
Skip out for beer during commercials,
Because the revolution will not be televised.

The revolution will not be televised.
The revolution will not be brought to you by Xerox
In 4 parts without commercial interruptions.
The revolution will not show you pictures of Nixon
blowing a bugle and leading a charge by John
Mitchell, General Abrams and Spiro Agnew to eat
hog maws confiscated from a Harlem sanctuary.
The revolution will not be televised.

The revolution will not be brought to you by the
Schaefer Award Theatre and will not star Natalie
Woods and Steve McQueen or Bullwinkle and Julia.
The revolution will not give your mouth sex appeal.
The revolution will not get rid of the nubs.
The revolution will not make you look five pounds
thinner, because the revolution will not be televised, Brother.

There will be no pictures of you and Willie May
pushing that shopping cart down the block on the dead run,
or trying to slide that color television into a stolen ambulance.
NBC will not be able predict the winner at 8:32
or report from 29 districts.
The revolution will not be televised.

There will be no pictures of pigs shooting down
brothers in the instant replay.
There will be no pictures of pigs shooting down
brothers in the instant replay.
There will be no pictures of Whitney Young being
run out of Harlem on a rail with a brand new process.
There will be no slow motion or still life of Roy
Wilkens strolling through Watts in a Red, Black and
Green liberation jumpsuit that he had been saving
For just the proper occasion.

Green Acres, The Beverly Hillbillies, and Hooterville
Junction will no longer be so damned relevant, and
women will not care if Dick finally gets down with
Jane on Search for Tomorrow because Black people
will be in the street looking for a brighter day.
The revolution will not be televised.

There will be no highlights on the eleven o’clock
news and no pictures of hairy armed women
liberationists and Jackie Onassis blowing her nose.
The theme song will not be written by Jim Webb,
Francis Scott Key, nor sung by Glen Campbell, Tom
Jones, Johnny Cash, Englebert Humperdink, or the Rare Earth.
The revolution will not be televised.

The revolution will not be right back after a message
bbout a white tornado, white lightning, or white people.
You will not have to worry about a dove in your
bedroom, a tiger in your tank, or the giant in your toilet bowl.
The revolution will not go better with Coke.
The revolution will not fight the germs that may cause bad breath.
The revolution will put you in the driver’s seat.

The revolution will not be televised, will not be televised,
will not be televised, will not be televised.
The revolution will be no re-run brothers;
The revolution will be live.

The Revolution Will Not Be Televised” is a poem and song by Gil Scott-Heron. The poem is notable for its extensive political and cultural references

Leonard Cohen – Democracy

April 23, 2010


“Democracy” by Leonard Cohen

It’s coming through a hole in the air, 
from those nights in Tiananmen Square. 
It’s coming from the feel 
that this ain’t exactly real, 
or it’s real, but it ain’t exactly there. 
From the wars against disorder, 
from the sirens night and day, 
from the fires of the homeless, 
from the ashes of the gay: 
Democracy is coming to the U.S.A. 
It’s coming through a crack in the wall; 
on a visionary flood of alcohol; 
from the staggering account 
of the Sermon on the Mount 
which I don’t pretend to understand at all. 
It’s coming from the silence 
on the dock of the bay, 
from the brave, the bold, the battered 
heart of Chevrolet: 
Democracy is coming to the U.S.A. 

It’s coming from the sorrow in the street, 
the holy places where the races meet; 
from the homicidal bitchin’ 
that goes down in every kitchen 
to determine who will serve and who will eat. 
From the wells of disappointment 
where the women kneel to pray 
for the grace of God in the desert here 
and the desert far away: 
Democracy is coming to the U.S.A. 

Sail on, sail on 
O mighty Ship of State! 
To the Shores of Need 
Past the Reefs of Greed 
Through the Squalls of Hate 
Sail on, sail on, sail on, sail on. 

It’s coming to America first, 
the cradle of the best and of the worst. 
It’s here they got the range 
and the machinery for change 
and it’s here they got the spiritual thirst. 
It’s here the family’s broken 
and it’s here the lonely say 
that the heart has got to open 
in a fundamental way: 
Democracy is coming to the U.S.A. 

It’s coming from the women and the men. 
O baby, we’ll be making love again. 
We’ll be going down so deep 
the river’s going to weep, 
and the mountain’s going to shout Amen! 
It’s coming like the tidal flood 
beneath the lunar sway, 
imperial, mysterious, 
in amorous array: 
Democracy is coming to the U.S.A. 

Sail on, sail on … 

I’m sentimental, if you know what I mean 
I love the country but I can’t stand the scene. 
And I’m neither left or right 
I’m just staying home tonight, 
getting lost in that hopeless little screen. 
But I’m stubborn as those garbage bags 
that Time cannot decay, 
I’m junk but I’m still holding up 
this little wild bouquet: 
Democracy is coming to the U.S.A.

Jimi Hendrix – The Star Spangled Banner

April 23, 2010

Art Before Power

April 23, 2010

New Jenny Holzer Exhibition Showcases National Security Archive’s Documents

Artist Projects Former Secrets onto Buildings, Walls, Floors, Memories

Washington D.C., June 17, 2004 – Noted modern artist Jenny Holzer, whose signature “xenon” film projectors have cast monumental light images of texts and truisms on the sides of buildings and landscapes from Florence to Buenos Aires, features the National Security Archive’s declassified documents in her latest exhibition, which opened on June 11 in Bregenz, Austria, through September 5.

Holzer’s texts for the Bregenz show, titled “Truth Before Power,” include more than 30 former secrets obtained by the National Security Archive through the Freedom of Information Act (primarily on U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East, especially Iraq), as well as an essay by the Archive’s director, Thomas Blanton, titled “The World’s Right to Know,” from the July/August 2002 issue of Foreign Policy.

The texts appear in a series of projections, from 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. each night between June 11 and June 18, onto such surfaces as the façade of the Kunsthaus Bregenz, the Rhomberg rock quarry, the Vermunt reservoir dam, and the “West Side Story” floating stage on Lake Constance. In addition, the top three floors of the Kunsthaus feature Holzer’s electronic sign arrays as they stream extracts of the texts.

“Jenny Holzer does for the digital age what a nail and broadsheet used to do, for example when Martin Luther pounded his theses onto the church door,” commented Thomas Blanton, the Archive’s director. “She turns every surface into a page, she illuminates not only texts but perception, and by projecting these secrets into the night she transforms the words of power into transitory bolts of lightning.”